CONCURRENT SESSIONS

BLOCK A: September 15 – 10:00am
A1 – Creating Caregiver-Friendly Communities: Working Together to help Family Caregivers Thrive

Family caregivers play an essential role in the care of individuals who are aging and/or living with a chronic progressive illness. This presentation will discuss the concept of caregiver-friendly communities and their importance in addressing the multi-faceted needs of caregivers.  Findings from a community engagement study conducted in rural Manitoba will be discussed, including the process and results of community engagement activities, and an outline of the co-designed community action plan for a caregiver-friendly community.

Jamie Penner, RN, PhD(c), Assistant Professor, College of Nursing, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba

A2/B2 – Prevent Burnout, Strengthen Caring: Enliven Your Journey Around the Circle of Caring

The Circle of Caring is a simple yet powerful model based on the 3 circles of: self, other, and caring. It offers guidance and direction to enhance how we work with others while strengthening ourselves and making intentional transitions in and out of careful work. The model is not theoretical, it was based on experimentation and practice after David burned out working in youth care while refusing to experience the unacceptable legacy of burnout, a permanent hardening of the human heart.

Please note this a 120 minute workshop and is continued into the next session.

David Zinger, M.Ed., David Zinger Associates

A3 – Expanding your Communication Toolbox: Strategies for Communicating during Difficult Times

Listen to a panel of experienced practitioners sharing their best techniques and strategies when working with clients. Techniques and strategies will be demonstrated through clear examples from practitioners serving a diverse range of clientele. Join the presenters after to ask follow-up questions and receive clarification, ensuring you walk away with concrete tools to use in your work with clients.

Trevor Lehmann, Canadian Certified Counsellor, CCPA, University of Manitoba

Linda Churchill, MMFT., RMFT., Student Counselling Centre, University of Manitoba

Doug Koop, Spiritual Health Practitioner, HSC

Dr. Natasha M. Ali, C. Psych, University of Manitoba & Manitoba Islamic Association

BLOCK B: September 15 – 11:15am
B1 – The Waiting Room Revolution: Testing practical patient-family exercises

Having heard the goals of the Waiting Room Revolution and the 7 skills to a better illness experience, the workshop will delve deeper into how one can use these skills in their everyday life. Moving from the theoretical to the practical world, we will explore ways patients, families, and health care providers can implement the 7 skills using simple exercises and tips.

Dr. Hsien Seow, PhD, BSc, Associate Professor, Department of Oncology, McMaster University

Dr. Samantha Winemaker, MD,CCFP, FCFP, BSc, Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Family Medicine, McMasters University

CONTINUED: A2/B2 – Prevent Burnout, Strengthen Caring: Enliven Your Journey Around the Circle of Caring

Please note this a 120 minute workshop and is continued from the previous session.

David Zinger, M.Ed., David Zinger Associates

B3 – Palliative Care for Muslims: Diversity and Gender Considerations

Within the health care system in general and especially for patients in palliative care and their families, culturally, and spiritually compatible care is essential. This session will inform, educate, and help develop the skills of health care providers. Raise awareness and knowledge base about the diverse Muslim community in Canada and health care.

Shahina Siddiqui, LLD, Founder & Volunteer Executive Director, Islamic Social Services Association

BLOCK C: September 15 – 1:15pm
C1 – What do Canadians say about their Preferred Location of Dying? Results from a National Mixed-Methods Policy Research Study

A national, team-based research project explored public preferences and interpretations of dying at home, prior to and during the Covid-19 pandemic. In this presentation, Dr. Funk will report the team’s findings drawn from survey data, qualitative interviews and document analyses. The implications of the findings for policy development and clinical practice will be discussed.

Dr. Laura Funk, Professor, University of Manitoba

C2 – The Genius of Dr. Seuss and its Relevance to Palliative Care

Nonsense wakes up the brain cells. And it helps develop a sense of humor, which is awfully important in this day and age. Humor has a tremendous place in this sordid world. It’s more than just a matter of laughing. If you can see things out of whack, then you can see how things can be in whack.” – Dr. Seuss

Reflecting upon the life and works of popular children’s author Theodor Seuss Geisel (“Dr. Seuss”), the role of art and literature in navigating life’s most difficult challenges will be explored in relation to the provision of end of life care.

Dr. Robin McClure, MD, CCFP(PC), Physician/Consultant, WRHA Palliative Care Program

C3 – Advance Care Planning – A Death Doula’s Perspective

Michelle Stokotelny, a trained death doula and experienced advance care planning facilitator, will be providing information that will help motivate you not only to begin your own advance care plan, but that will also inspire you to have important discussions about end of life care with your loved ones. Life is beautiful and uncertain, and this is your opportunity to make your wishes known to the people who mean the most to you!

Michelle Stokotelny, Death Doula, Grief Counsellor, Palliative Manitoba Volunteer, Advance Care Planning and Death Café Facilitator

BLOCK D: September 16 – 10:00am
D1 – The Palliation of Movement Disorders

This presentation focuses on the palliation of patients with movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s Disease. The talk follows a patient in his ongoing journey with Parkinson’s Disease and discusses challenges he meets along the way. Advice is given on managing physical symptoms, having serious illness conversations to help clarified goals of care and on knowing when to refer.

Dr. Jana Pilkey, MD, FRCPC Internal Medicine, Palliative Medicine. Associate Professor University of Manitoba, Physician Consultant WRHA Palliative Care Program

D2/E2 – Medical Assistance in Dying – An Interdisciplinary Overview with Updates

MAiD team members will review recent and upcoming changes to the federal medical assistance in dying legislation including impacts of the changes for the MAiD team and palliative care teams. Presentation will include: ethical considerations around communicating with patients about MAiD; an approach for patients with communication impairment and discussion of bereavement supports.

Please note this a 120 minute workshop and is continued into the next session.

Dr. Kim Wiebe, MD, FRCPC, MPH, Medical Director, Medical Assistance in Dying Shared Health Services (Manitoba)

Jennifer Dunsford, RN, MN, MPA, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences College of Nursing, University of Manitoba

Caitlin Buchel, RSLP, MClSc, SLP (C), Owner/Managing Clinician, Buchel Speech & Language Group

Lindsay Bacala, BA Adv., BSSW, MSW, RSW, Psychosocial Program Specialist, Medical Assistance in Dying Shared Health Services (Manitoba)

D3 – Canadian Memorial Quilt: An Online Portal to Interconnectedness and Healing Following the Losses of the Covid-19 Pandemic

Canadian Memorial Quilt is envisioned by Elder Albert McLeod, funded by Winnipeg Foundation, and implemented by Canadian Virtual Hospice, with direction from an expert Advisory Committee. The guiding principles aim to address ongoing need to supplement restricted in-person memorial and funeral services, through an online forum respectful of cultural traditions, promoting healing and community-building. Visually and conceptually, the project is rooted in the quilting tradition. Memorial Quilt emphasizes accessibility to Indigenous, Islamic, and other culturally-coherent communities.

Elder Albert McLeod, Knowledge Keeper, 2Spirit Consultants

Shelly Cory, Executive Director, Canadian Virtual Hospice

Jennifer Gurke, MEd, MSW, RSW, Executive Director, Palliative Manitoba

BLOCK E: September 16 – 11:15am
E1 – Cerebrovascular Accident (CVA) and Palliative Care

Cerebrovascular Accidents (CVAs) are being encountered at increasing frequency due to an aging population. Despite this, many practitioners find CVAs to be a particularly difficult condition to approach. We will focus on some important prognostic indicators, helpful communication tools, complexities of substitute decision making, and underrecognized symptoms of CVA. The presentation is largely based on the article from the Journal of Palliative Medicine titled “Top Ten Tips Palliative Care Clinicians Should Know About Strokes”. 

Dr. Braeden Debroni, MD (CCFP, PC), WRHA Palliative Care Program

CONTINUED: D2/E2 – Medical Assistance in Dying – An Interdisciplinary Overview with Updates

Please note this a 120 minute workshop and is continued from the previous session.

Dr. Kim Wiebe, MD, FRCPC, MPH, Medical Director, Medical Assistance in Dying Shared Health Services (Manitoba)

Jennifer Dunsford, RN, MN, MPA, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences College of Nursing, University of Manitoba

Caitlin Buchel, RSLP, MClSc, SLP (C), Owner/Managing Clinician, Buchel Speech & Language Group

Lindsay Bacala, BA Adv., BSSW, MSW, RSW, Psychosocial Program Specialist, Medical Assistance in Dying Shared Health Services (Manitoba)

E3 – Grief Literacy: Supporting Grieving Children Through Shared Language

This presentation will define grief literacy and how to support grieving children through shared language and open conversations. Participants will explore methods of talking to children about death and feelings of grief; age appropriate definitions; as well as strategies and resources to support grieving children.

Carla Mitchell, MSW, Puddle Jumper Publishing

BLOCK F: September 16 – 1:15pm
F1 – Non-Forced Care: Using An Individualized Approach to Care

In health care we experience challenges when patients regularly refuse care and it starts to impact their well-being. It is difficult to balance someone’s right to refuse care while still ensuring their care needs are being met. The Non-Forced Care approach helps to create individualized care plans for patients who refuse care on a regular basis and guide the team to creative strategies to continually try and provide care in a safe and liable manner.

Kayla Vanderwees, RNBN, Riverview Health Centre

F2 – Provision of Patient and Family Centred Care to Critically Ill Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

Despite advances in modern medicine, intensive care unit (ICU) patients experience high mortality, and their families and ICU survivors have high mental health burden following their hospitalization. Provision of patient and family centered care interventions including expanded visitation, family involvement in care, improved communication and optimizing analgesia and sedation, can improve the outcomes of both families and survivors. Results of a pilot study using Patient Dignity Question (PDQ) by ICU families will be discussed.

Dr. Kendiss Olafson, MD FRCPC MPH, Assistant Professor, Section of Critical Care , Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Science, University of Manitoba

Lucas Mosienko, BSc, Clinical Research Coordinator, Critical Care Research Group, St Boniface Hospital

Salina Pirzada, BScH MSc, Department of Psychiatry, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences

 

F3 – Cultivating Hope during Challenging Times

Uncertainty comes from many life circumstances and creates anxiety, but sows the seeds of hope as well. Learn how to cultivate hope and ways to apply passive and active hope to manage the challenges of our present moment.

Trevor Lehmann, Canadian Certified Counsellor, CCPA, University of Manitoba