Palliative Care Conference: Webinar Series

Palliative Manitoba is pleased to offer this free webinar series in lieu of the 29th Annual Provincial Palliative Care Conference being postponed until September 16-17, 2021.

This webinar series will include educator, registered psychotherapist, nurse, and thanatologist, Andrea Warnick. 2021 conference keynote speaker, Dr. David Kenneth Wright, PhD, RN, CHPCN(C), Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa. And 2021 conference keynote speaker Dr. Gevenvive Thompson, RN PhD, Associate Professor, College of Nursing, University of Manitoba.

REGISTRATION FOR WEBINARS ARE NOW FULL. 
Videos will be recorded and posted for individuals to view afterwards.

Please note there is a maximum of 100 participants per session.

Those who register and attend all 3 webinars will be entered to win a complimentary 2 day registration for the 2021 conference!


Andrea Warnick

Educator, Registered Psychotherapist, Nurse, and Thanatologist.

Supporting Children and Youth who are Grieving the Dying or Death of Someone in their Lives

 

Palliative Care Conference: Webinar Series 1 from Palliative Manitoba on Vimeo.


Dr. David Kenneth Wright

PhD, RN, CHPCN(C), Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH, 2020
10:00 – 11:00 AM

Session is now full!

 
Grieving a New Kind of Death: Implications of Medical Assistance in Dying for Bereavement

A key commitment of palliative care is attending to grief. Medical assistance in dying (MAiD) is legal in Canada, with unknown implications for bereavement. In this session we present early findings from ongoing research interviews with people who are grieving a MAiD death. We will review existing knowledge about grief in this context, and consider how existing bereavement supports are suited to the needs of MAiD grievers.


Dr. Genevieve Thompson

RN PhD, Associate Professor, College of Nursing, University of Manitoba

FRIDAY, JANUARY 15TH, 2021
10:00 – 11:00 AM

Session is now full!

 

Dying Alone: Always a Bad Outcome?

This session will engage participants in a discussion around the meaning society places on dying alone and explore four different perspectives long-term care residents, family members and staff hold around the importance of presence at the time of death.